McWitty Press

 

Enter SandmanReviews for Enter Sandman

Enter Sandman starts out like chick lit, but as in The Bell Jar, after making you squirm for the protagonist, it whacks you with a sucker punch of tragedy....Destined for a long life in print.”
Don Wallace, Kirkus Reviews

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“In the spirit of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the heroine of Stephanie Williams’s charming and unflinching novel, Enter Sandman, comes to New York looking for fortune, romance, and fulfillment. Trisha Portman has it all: blond hair, great looks, and a job at the hottest art gallery in town. One day, a piece of luck as big as the Ritz, falls into her lap in the form of a violent and riveting painting. The history of the painting takes us through Trisha’s surprising past and edgy present. With deft and graceful strokes, Stephanie Williams has created a rip-roaring read told with compassion, irony, and a flair for the truth.”
Betsy Carter, author of Nothing to Fall Back On

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Enter Sandman is nothing you’d expect—particularly if you expect a book by a young woman dying of cancer to be depressing or preachy. Stephanie Williams is a young woman with cancer, but the book she’s written is funny, feisty, and full of a kind of spirit we would all do well to imitate. Read this and weep, yes, but also laugh and admire. Most of all, just read it.”
Sara Nelson, author of So Many Books, So Little Time

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SHAPE magazine calls Enter Sandman "engrossing" and "courageous"!

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In September's Women's Health Special Issue, you can find Gail O'Conner's review of Enter Sandman in the Shape Your Life News section on page 40.

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“If Sex and the City had a heart, as well as a grin and an attitude, it would be Enter Sandman, written by Stephanie Williams. This is a funny and tragic and game book by a game and accomplished girl. Correction: A game and funny and tragic story written with style by a woman in full.”
Jacquelyn Mitchard, author of The Deep End of the Ocean and Twelve Times Blessed

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Don't miss the review from the Boston Globe, 'Illness and illusion, refracted through the novel' by Caroline Leavitt. You can read it here at Boston.com.

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See also the article by Caroline Hwang in the U. of Penn Gazette which includes a lengthy excerpt from the book.